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Picture: © Dieter Hartwig
LES PETITES MORTS - all my holes are theirs by Angela Schubot / Jared Gradinger
Picture: © Dieter Hartwig
LES PETITES MORTS - all my holes are theirs von Angela Schubot / Jared Gradinger
LES PETITES MORTS - all my holes are theirs by Angela Schubot / Jared Gradinger
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Logo of the Hebbel am Ufer

Angela Schubot / Jared Gradinger

LES PETITES MORTS - all my holes are theirs

in collaboration with Aleesa Cohene

Can you make yourself disappear through excessive devotion to a third person? Practically relinquishing yourself to your own dissolution? And what does this mean for this third person’s visibility? Can the “egocentrism” of three performers transform into intimacy, can identities be dissolved and can other forms of co-existence be achieved? Can you die for someone else? “all my holes are theirs” is a trio by Aleesa Cohene and Jared Gradinger/Angela Schubot. After “i hope you die soon” it is the second part of their project “LES PETITES MORTS”, an examination of the topic of death and dying. This piece is the attempt by two performers to disappear through radical devotion to a third. For Gradinger and Schubot, Cohenes become the sole existing universe. But “all my holes are theirs” is also an intimate solo by and for Aleesa Cohene, who appears on stage as a dancer for the first time in this project.

Complementary Installation 24 April / HAU3
Aleesa Cohene / Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay
The Same Problem 3

Further performance 26 April as part of the Schubot/Gradinger-Marathon.
Past dates
April 2014
ca. 60 min
Choreography & Performance
Jared Gradinger
 
Angela Schubot, Aleesa Cohene
Music
Datashock from the album Die Pyramiden von Geißen engineered by Tian Rotteveel
Light design
Andreas Harder
Artistic collaboration
Sigal Zouk
Costume
Heidi Lunaire
Production: Angela Schubot and Jared Gradinger in Collaboration with Aleesa Cohene. Coproduktion: HAU Hebbel am Ufer, Sophiensaele, Südpol Luzern, Les Grandes Traversées and Ballet l'Opera national du Rhin - Centre choréographique national. Supported by University of Toronto German/Europe Research and Study Fund. Funded by Hauptstadtkulturfonds.